rebeccas-family-restaurant

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From Views and Voices Magazine
October 2009 issue
Story and Photography by:
Christina Greggs

Lead photo was replaced by
Webmaster...Christina's was better.

BRR AND SHIVER! THAT CHILL IN THE MORNINGS CAN ONLY MEAN ONE THING: SUMMER IS OVER AND THE FALL SEASON IS SET TO TAKE OVER.

This also means you’re going to be filling your days with airing out your sweater collection, shopping for flannel sheets and putting up festive décor.

Busy preparing for the weather change one fall day my h u s b a n d Charles and I decided to take a break and drive north to scope out falls artwork. While marveling at the leaves brilliant colors of red, gold and orange, we came across another treat of the season, Rebecca’s Family Restaurant in Linesville.

rebeccas-linesville

The Crawford County locale is best known for the spillway the "place where the ducks walk on fishes backs" according to a local, because of the amount of carp in that section of Pymatuning Lake. One of the most popular tourist attractions in the state, visitors come from miles around to feed the carp, and birds, such as ducks, walk across the backs of the multitude of carp all vying for food thrown by visitors. Linesville also has the distinction of having one of the youngest elected mayors in the nation - Christopher Seeley who was 18 at the time of his election in 2005, according to Wikipedia.com, which also claims that Linesville was also known as the onion Capital of the U.S. with the Pennsylvania Railroad delivering them across the country

But ducks, onions and mayors aside, since we were both hungry from leaf hunting, we decided to stop in and see what Rebecca’s Family Restaurant had to offer: As we entered the eatery located on West Erie Street, the mouth-watering aromas coming from the kitchen assured us that we would not be disenchanted.

We were seated by the owner, Barb Hogan, who told us that the restaurant was named alter her 8-year-old daughter (“The Boss") and that they have been running the establishment for two years.

Previous to that, the restaurant had originally been a harness shop before becoming part of the Isaly’s enterprise for a number of years. When the Isaly’s restaurant closed another family style eatery took over. With the mindset that nothing makes people happier than good food and her love of being around people, Hogan always wanted to run her own restaurant. After taking an early retirement from being a state employee, she was able to fulfill her dream.

milkshake-machineOriginally she planned to renovate her new place into a 1950’s and 1960’s style cafe, but when they discovered brick walls hidden behind plaster, they decided to go in another direction and transformed the place into a delightful country style restaurant.

Locally made tables and chairs country style decor and colors now adorn the eatery, but items from a bygone era can still be found at the locale. The hardwood floors are original and a working stainless steel milkshake machine pays quiet homage to its Isaly roots. Adding to the fun and décor are crafted items donated-by local residents and a community bookshelf in the back where books can be borrowed on the honor system.